Center for Civic Engagement

Cougs Vote

Voting is part of being an active citizen, and your vote can make a difference. For instance, in the 2004 race for governor in Washington, Christine Gregoire won by only 129 votes, and only 60% of eligible citizens voted!

What would have happened if one student group campaigned at WSU for a different candidate? The outcome of this race could have been very different.

Your vote. Your voice. Be heard.

  • Why Should I Vote?

    Your Vote Does Matter.

    Voting is your way to influence our country politics and laws and create the future you want to see. Often, voters feel like their vote doesn't matter, but there are many examples in US history where elections were won by only a few votes! For instance, in the 2004 race for governor in Washington, Christine Gregoire won by only 129 votes! Further, only 60% of Washington residents over 18 voted in this race.

    What if the other 40% of Washington voters had cast their vote? What would have happened if one student group campaigned at WSU for a different candidate? The outcome of this race would have been very different.

    Voting is Your Right & Responsibility.

    Voting is also a right that many US citizens have fought hard for, so voting honors the sacrifices many men and women made to ensure you have the right to vote. Voting is not only your right but also your duty to honor the sacrifices of those who fought for your right.

    You're Voting for More than the President.

    Nationally, we're all voting on who will be our next President and Vice President, but by state, we are voting on who will be our new congressional and state representatives and on new laws. Nationally, 469 out of 535 congressional seats are up for election, which is 88% of congress. In Washington, there will be 163 state representatives and measures on our November 8 ballots. Your vote impacts much more than just who will be our next President! Click on the sections below to learn more and explore which candidates align best with your views.

  • Learn About What You're Voting On

    iCitizen, an app for Android and iPhones, allows you to look at the voting history, campaign donors, and more for your local, state, and national representatives. You can also answer poll questions and see how people in your area and throughout the country are responding.

    Download iCitizen>>

    You can also explore state representative's biographies, votes, positions, ratings, speeches, and funding on VoteSmart.org by entering your zip code or a representative's name in their I Spy or Political Galaxy tools on their main page.

    Explore Your Political Galaxy on VoteSmart.org>>

    But what about ballot measures? Each state has a variety of measures on their ballot each year addressing state laws and issues such as gun control, minimum wage, health care, and education. These measures vary by state, so the best ways to look through what issues will appear on your state's ballot is to visit your state Secretary of State's website and to review the measures listed on Ballotpedia.org.

    Find Your State Secretary of State's Website>>

    Explore Ballot Measures by State on Ballotpedia.org>>

  • Coug Day at the Capitol (February 20, 2017)

    Each spring your ASWSU representatives host the annual Coug Day at the Capitol, an annual lobby day where students travel to Olympia to directly meet with legislators and discuss higher education issues. This is a great opportunity for students to take an active role in ensuring that their education remains affordable and competitive and to practice your public speaking skills.

    The 2017 Coug Day at the Capitol will take place February 19-20. As registration forms for each campus become available, we will add registration links here.